28 - 31 August 2013
Torino, Italy

RN33 – Women’s and Gender Studies

Coordinators:
Maria Carmela Agodi agodi@unina.it University Federico II, Naples, Italy
Michael Meuser Michael.Meuser@fk12.tu-dortmund.de Technische Universität Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany

RN33 promotes international research into social inequalities and the regimes of power that shape gender relations as well as symbolic constructions and representations of masculinity and femininity in the past and at present. Research should address the ruptures and non-synchronic developments in social reality, especially among European societies and within Europe as a whole with its nested and gendered concept of citizenship. While gender equality is a general aim of European policies, women are still empirically disadvantaged on a large scale. Moreover, differences in representation and social inequalities among women in European societies are important issues of social research. The RN invites for sending abstracts on issues about the contradictions, paradoxes and changes of the existing gender order in Europe, especially in the situation of the ongoing financial and social crisis.

The activities of RN 33 at the Torino Conference 2013 will be organized in thematic sessions that will be identified after the deadline for individual proposals in February 2013.

Sessions

  • 0000RN33 Minority Women and the Access to Social Rights
    Chair: Lena Inowlocki Andrea Müller-Fabian, <andrea_fabian_muller@yahoo.com>, Faculty of Sociology and Social Work-Hungarian Department Babes-Bolyai University; Bernhard Weicht, <b.ueicht@uu.nl>, Social Policy and Intervention Studies Utrecht University
  • 000RN33 Women’s movements, european politics and gender activism
    Chair: Francesca Zajczyk <francesca.zajczyk@unimib.it>, Università di Milano Bicocca
  • 005RN33 Tradition, the gender order and participatory behavior
    Chair: Anil Ali-Rebholz, <ali-rebholz@soz.uni-frankfurt.de>, University of Frankfurt, Germany
  • 01RN33 Bodies, Practices and Identity Models
    Chair: Carmen Leccardi <carmen.leccardi@unimib.it>, Dipartimento di Sociologia e ricerca sociale, Università di Milano Bicocca
  • a01RN33 Femicide: An Increasing Phenomenon?
    Chair: Consuelo Corradi, <corradi@lumsa.it>, Dipartimento di Scienze umane, Università LUMSA, Roma.

    Against a backdrop of a session held in RN33 in Geneva on femicide and the subsequent establishment of a pan-European coalition on the subject through COST Action IS1206, this session will discuss femicide as an extreme form of violence against women. Presenters are encouraged to address questions such as: Are there any patterns in femicide and do the murderers have anything in common? Is it associated with migration? What steps are taken by different governments to reduce the incidence of femicide? Is this phenomenon increasing as a result of improved reporting? Presenters are asked to report case-studies or statistical data of intimate partner femicide and related phenomena from different European countries.

  • b01RN33 Negotiating the Gender Order in the Household (1)
    Chair: Maria Carmela Agodi, <agodi@unina.it>, Dipartimento di Scienze politiche, Università di Napoli Federico II
  • 02RN33 Migration and Gender Relations in Europe
    Chairs: Ursula Apitzsch <apitzsch@soz.uni-frankfurt.de>, Cornelia Goethe Centrum fur Frauenstudien und die Erforschung der Geschlechterverhaltnisse, J.W. Goethe-Universität Frankfurt and Evie Tastsoglou <evie.tastsoglou@gmail.com>,Department of Sociology and Criminology, Saint Mary’s University, Halifax.

    European societies after years of financial and economic crises are confronted with new transnational migration flows mainly of women and young people without perspectives in their home countries. We are observing new migratory flows from the Southern EU countries, which from the fifties to the seventies of the 20th century were sending guest workers to Northern and Western Europe. The question is which consequences the increasing trans-nationalization of generations of European families has for the development of more gender differences or more gender equality. The proposed session gives space to present empirical investigations on the consequences of these developments, including the consequences of the Amsterdam Treaty which refers to race, ethnicity, age and sexual preference in anti-discrimination law and suggests a more inclusive definition of citizenship rights and protection in the EU on a supranational level. The session will also include papers dealing with new policies that might emerge in response to new migratory patterns and the new framing of civil, social, and political citizenship rights. They have to counteract the danger that transnational politics and new forms of governance may exacerbate the democratic deficits of the European Union.

  • a02RN33 Gender in the Workplace
    Chair: Michael Meuser <michael.meuser@uni-dortmund.de>, Institut fur Soziologie der Technische Universitat, Dortmund, Germany
  • b02RN33 Negotiating the Gender Order in the Household (2)
    Chair: Lena Inowlocki <inowlocki@soz.uni-frankfurt.de>,Institute for Migration Studies and Intercultural Communication (IMiK) University of Applied Sciences , Frankfurt, Germany
  • 03RN33 Studying and Working at University: Gendered Paths and Careers
    Chair: Maria Carmela Agodi, <agodi@unina.it>, Dipartimento di Scienze politiche, Università di Napoli Federico II
  • a03RN33 Violence against Women
    Chair: Milica Antic Gaber, milica.antic-gaber@guest.arnes.si, Department of Sociology, University of Ljubljana
  • b03RN33 Women in Rural Contexts
    Chair: Rossana Trifiletti <rossana.trifilettil@unifi.it> , Dipartimento di Scienze politiche e sociali, Università di Firenze
  • a04RN33 Motherhood
    Chair: Marie Thérèse Letablier <marie-therese.letablier@univ-paris1.fr, Centre d’Economie de la Sorbonne, Universitè Paris 1, Paris
  • b04RN33 Women and Islam
    Chair: Anil Al-Rebholz <al-rebholz@uni-frankfurt.de>, University of Frankfurt, Germany
  • a05RN33 Care and Migration
    Chair: Costanza Tobio <ctobio@polsoc.uc3m.es>, Dept. de Ciencias Politicas y Sociologia, Universidad Crlos III, Madrid
  • b05RN33 Masculinity Models
    Chaiir: Elisabetta Ruspini <elisabetta.ruspini@nimib.it>, Dipartimento di Sociologia e Ricerca Sociale, Università di Milano Bicocca
  • a06RN33 Women, Politics and Participatory Behaviour
    Chair: Rossana Trifiletti, rossana.trifiletti@unifi.it, Departimento di Scienze politiche e sociali, Università di Firenze
  • b06RN33 Fatherhood
    Chair: Marie Thérèse Letablier <marie-therese.letablier@univ-paris1.fr, Centre d’Economie de la Sorbonne, Université Paris 1, Paris
  • 0RN33 (open)
  • PosterRN33 Poster Session

Joint Sessions

  • 01_23JS28JS33Sports, Gender and Sexualities (1)

    Joint session with RN23 – Sexuality and RN28 – Society and Sports

    Chair: Oktay Aktan <oktay.aktan@tu-dortmund.de>, University of Dortmunt Michael Meuser <michael.meuser@tu-dortmund.de>, University of Dortmunt Alessandro Porrovecchio <alessandro.porrovecchio@gmail.com>, University of the Littoral Opal Coast

    In team sports, the selection of a player for a team is not merely a technical decision. The player who can cope and harmonize with the collective team identity is chosen by the coach. Being suitable or to fit into the team is also a question of gender. In a homo-social dimension, especially among men, there is the question of how the process of choosing or to be chosen (re)produce a hierarchy of masculinities. In a hetero-social dimension the gender segregation is established from the beginning of the organized sport competitions, which harshly distinguishes the male and female teams and championships from each other. On the other hand, the formation of a team i.e. the constitution of collectivity for instance in amateur leisure sports and/or sports in schools can/may turn out to be a question of negotiation.

    With this in mind, we intend to organize a network session between sport and gender studies, to discuss the reflections of both intra- and inter-gender relations in sports on the progressive re-constellation of “gender” perception in society. The current social scientific approach of intersectionality including other dimensions of social inequality, such as ethnicity, milieu, religion etc. will also be of particular interest in our session.

  • 02_23JS28JS33Sports, Gender and Sexualities (2)

    Joint session with RN28 – Society and Sports and RN23 – Sexuality

    Alessandro Porrovecchio <alessandro.porrovecchio@gmail.com>, University of the Littoral Opal Coast Michael Meuser <michael.meuser@tu-dortmund.de>, University of Dortmunt Oktay Aktan <oktay.aktan@tu-dortmund.de>, University of Dortmunt

    Being expressions of cultural embodiment, both sexuality and sports can be analyzed as a mirror of societies’ transformations. For this reason the analysis of sports and sexuality can be a key to analyze changes in social interaction and collective representations.

    In order to contribute to these streams of research and to open new horizons for further investigation, we invite papers aimed at both understanding the relationships between sports and sexualities, and using them as a tool to analyse broader social transformations. For example: how have sports and physical cultures built their specificities, in particular with relation to genders and sexual differences and consequently to body-related social norms? How have sports’ institutions managed to include gender and sexual diversities (e.g. cases of intersexed and/or transgender athletes)? Which innovations can be observed in sport practices (techniques, dressing-codes, aesthetics, etc.) with relation to sexuality? To what extent have issues of sexual violence and homophobia amongst sport fans been successfully addressed? What are the contemporary challenges and opportunities when we consider the relationship between sports and sexuality? We encourage contributors to address questions of this sort, thus exploring the importance of gender and sexuality in sports’ research, and vice versa, examining how sports matters in sexuality research.

  • 19_28JS33Gender and Sexual Harassment at Work and in Leisure Time (Sport)

    Joint session with RN28 – Society and Sports

    Chair:Kari Fasting <kari.fasting@nih.no>, Norwegian School of Sport and Physical Education Maria Carmela Agodi <agodi@unina.it>, University of Naples “Federico II”

    Violence against women is a worldwide problem. It occurs in all regions, countries, societies and cultures. It affects women irrespective of income, class, race or ethnicity. According to the UN General Assembly the many forms of violence to which women are subject include: sexual abuse, sexual harassment and intimidation at work and in educational institutions, and today we can also add sport to this list. UN documents define gender-based violence as a violation of women’s human rights and a form of discrimination that prevents women from participating fully in society, and fulfilling their potentials as human beings.

    Research on sexual harassment was first undertaken in the workplace and in the educational system where it seems to be very widespread. Different European studies place the proportion of women experiencing workplace sexual harassment at between 45 and 81 per cent. Prevalence figures from sport vary between 17 and 56%.

    The studies on gender and sexual harassment in sport have drawn upon definitions, theories and methods used in workplace studies. It would therefore be interesting to gather researchers from both of these environments to present and discuss the latest empirical and/or theoretical and methodological scientific work in these areas. Depending on the people interested in contributing to the symposium, it could be narrowed down to such areas as: prevalence, types of impacts, prevention, theories, as well as methodological and ethical challenges.

  • 28JS33AGender and sexual harassment at work and in leisure time (sport)

    Joint session with RN28 – Society and Sports

    Chairs: Kari Fasting & Elina Oinas

    Violence against women is a worldwide problem. It occurs in all regions, countries, societies and cultures. It affects women irrespective of income, class, race or ethnicity. According to the UN General Assembly the many forms of violence to which women are subject include: sexual abuse, sexual harassment and intimidation at work and in educational institutions, and today we can also add sport to this list. UN documents define gender-based violence as a violation of women’s human rights and a form of discrimination that prevents women from participating fully in society, and fulfilling their potentials as human beings.

    Research on sexual harassment was first undertaken in the workplace and in the educational system where it seems to be very widespread. Different European studies place the proportion of women experiencing workplace sexual harassment at between 45 and 81 per cent. Prevalence figures from sport vary between 17 and 56%.

    The studies on gender and sexual harassment in sport have drawn upon definitions, theories and methods used in workplace studies. It would therefore be interesting to gather researchers from both of these environments to present and discuss the latest empirical and/or theoretical and methodological scientific work in these areas. Depending on the people interested in contributing to the symposium, it could be narrowed down to such areas as: prevalence, types of impacts, prevention, theories, as well as methodological and ethical challenges.

  • 99_28JS33Gender and Sexual Harassment at Work and in Leisure Time (Sport) – II

    Joint session with RN28 – Society and Sports

    Kari Fasting <kari.fasting@nih.no>, Norwegian School of Sport and Physical Education Elina Oinas <elina.oinas@helsinki.fi> University of Helsinki Maria Carmela Agodi <agodi@unina.it> University Federico II in Naples

    Violence against women is a worldwide problem. It occurs in all regions, countries, societies and cultures. It affects women irrespective of income, class, race or ethnicity. According to the UN General Assembly the many forms of violence to which women are subject include: sexual abuse, sexual harassment and intimidation at work and in educational institutions, and today we can also add sport to this list. UN documents define gender-based violence as a violation of women’s human rights and a form of discrimination that prevents women from participating fully in society, and fulfilling their potentials as human beings.

    Research on sexual harassment was first undertaken in the workplace and in the educational system where it seems to be very widespread. Different European studies place the proportion of women experiencing workplace sexual harassment at between 45 and 81 per cent. Prevalence figures from sport vary between 17 and 56%.

    The studies on gender and sexual harassment in sport have drawn upon definitions, theories and methods used in workplace studies. It would therefore be interesting to gather researchers from both of these environments to present and discuss the latest empirical and/or theoretical and methodological scientific work in these areas. Depending on the people interested in contributing to the symposium, it could be narrowed down to such areas as: prevalence, types of impacts, prevention, theories, as well as methodological and ethical challenges.


Thank you very much to all participants for making esa torino an outstanding conference.